Editor in Chief
Prof. Dr. Cornelia M. Keck
Philipps-Universität Marburg
Marburg, Germany

Bibliography
Welcome to the research group of Prof. Dr. Cornelia M. Keck in Marburg. Cornelia M. Keck is a pharmacist and obtained her PhD in 2006 from the Freie Universität (FU) in Berlin. In 2009 she was appointed as Adjunct Professor for Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Nanotechnology at the University Putra Malaysia (UPM) and in 2011 she obtained her Venia legendi (Habilitation) at the Freie Universität Berlin and was appointed as a Professor for Pharmacology and Pharmaceutics at the University of Applied Sciences Kaiserslautern. Since 2016 she is Professor of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics at the Philipps-Universität Marburg. Her field of research is the development and characterization of innovative nanocarriers for improved delivery of poorly soluble actives for healthcare and cosmetics. Prof. Keck is executive board member of the German Association of Nanotechnology (Deutscher Verband Nanotechnologie), Vize-chairman of the unit „Dermocosmetics“ at the German Society of Dermopharmacy, active member in many pharmaceutical societies and member of the BfR Committee for Cosmetics at the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR).
Journal Highlights
Abbreviation: J App Pharm
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.21065/19204159
Frequency: Annual 
Current Volume: 9 (2017)
Next scheduled volume: December, 2018 (Volume 10)
Back volumes: 1-9
Starting year: 2009
Nature: Online 
Submission: Online  
Language: English

NANOPATTERNING: IMPLICATIONS IN REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
Maha Nasr
1. Associate Professor of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Egypt 2. Faculty of Pharmacy, Mutah University, Jordan
Keywords: Nanopatterning, implications, regenerative medicine
Abstract

Regenerative medicine is based on stem cells, which have the ability to differentiate into special type of body cells, and hence, they were proven clinically successful in organ transplantation, as well as in the functional treatment of several diseases. Nanotechnology, which is the science depending on particles of dimensions below 1 micrometer has gained considerable interest in the field of regenerative medicine, especially when nanoparticles are constructed from biodegradable organic and inorganic biomaterials.

Article Information

Identifiers and Pagination:
Year:2017
Volume:9
First Page:31
Last Page:32
Publisher Id:JAppPharm (2017 ). 9. 31-32
Article History:
Received:December 15, 2017
Accepted:December 19, 2017
Collection year:2017
First Published:December 27, 2017

Regenerative medicine is based on stem cells, which have the ability to differentiate into special type of body cells, and hence, they were proven clinically successful in organ transplantation, as well as in the functional treatment of several diseases (1). Nanotechnology, which is the science depending on particles of dimensions below 1 micrometer has gained considerable interest in the field of regenerative medicine, especially when nanoparticles are constructed from biodegradable organic and inorganic biomaterials (1).

In order to direct the spreading and adhesion of stem cells, nanopatterning has emerged as a cellular environment mimicking technique in order to control aspects related to differentiation of stem cells by virtue of their molecular interaction (2,3). It has been demonstrated that cellular differentiation can primarily be affected by changes in the geometry, dimensions and orientation of the nanopatterns (4). Several technologies were reported in the literature to create such nanopatterns, such as Dip-pen nanolithography, nanografting, polymer phase separation, metal anodization, capillary molding, preparation of nanofibrous scaffolds, and three dimensional chips (4,5).

Despite the existing and anticipated successes related to the application of nanopatterning technology in stem cell therapy, there are still many aspects that need to be addressed before clinical translation of this technology, such as the full identification of the molecular mechanisms of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions, and the verification of whether the nanopatterned surface would allow full functioning of the stem cells or not. Moreover, the safety of these nanostructures needs to be fully explored at the molecular level before we can see further futuristic advances for these technologies, which requires an extensive research input from multidisciplinary teams in the coming period.

 

References

1-       Yi DK, Nanda SS, Kim K, Selvan ST. Recent progress in nanotechnology for stem cell differentiation, labeling, tracking and therapy. J Mater Chem, 2017, 48: 1-45.

2-       Dobbenga S, Fratila-Apachitei LE, Zadpoor AA. Nanopattern-induced ostrogenic differentiation of stem cells- A systemic review. Acta Biomater, 2016, 46: 3-14.

3-       Jeon K, Oh HJ, Lim H, Kim JH, Lee DH, Lee ER, Park BH, Cho SG. Self-renewal of embryonic stem cells through culture on nanopattern polydimethylsiloxane substrate. Biomaterials, 2012, 33: 5206-5220.

4-       El-Said WA, Kim T-H, Lee K-B, Choi J-W. Nanopatterned Surfaces for Stem-Cell Engineering, in Stem-Cell Nanoengineering (eds H. Baharvand and N. Aghdami), John Wiley & Sons, Inc, Hoboken, NJ, 2015.

5-       Kim J, Kim HN, Lim KT, Kim Y, Seonwoo H, Park SH, Lim HJ, Kim DH, Suh KY, Choung PH, Choung YH, Chung JH. Designing nanotopographical density of extracellular matrix for controlled morphology and function of human mesenchymal stem cells. Sci Rep, 2013, 3: 3552.


© 2016 The Author(s). This open access article is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 license. You are free to: Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially. The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms. Under the following terms: Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. No additional restrictions You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits

Subject & Scope
  • Pharmaceutics
  • Physical Pharmacy 
  • Dosage Forms Science 
  • Pharmaceutical Microbiology & Immunology 
  • Industrial Pharmacy 
  • Bio-Pharmaceutics 
  • Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
  • Pharmaceutical Instrumentation 
  • Medicinal Chemistry 
  • Pharmacognosy 
  • Physiology &Histology 
  • Anatomy & Pathology 
  • Pharmacology & Therapeutics 
  • Pharmacy Practice 
  • Pharmaceutical Mathematics   
  • Biostatistics 
  • Dispensing 
  • Community Social & Administrative Pharmacy 
  • Hospital Pharmacy 
  • Clinical Pharmacy 
  • Pharmaceutical Quality Management 
  • Forensic Pharmacy 
  • Pharmaceutical Technology 
  • Pharmaceutical Management & Marketing

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